jeudi 11 février 2016

Thrymskvida - The Lay of Thrym

Thrymskvida - The Lay of Thrym 


Wroth was Vingthorr when awaking he

Mjollnir missed, his mighty hammer;

his beard gan shake, his shaggy head,

Fjorgyn's first-born-- he fumbled about him.

These words then first fell from his lips:

"Hear thou, Loki, what loss I have,

which no wight knows-- neither on earth

nor in Heaven: my hammer is stolen!"

To Freyja's bower they bent their steps.

These words then first fell from his lips:

"Wilt thou, Freyja, thy feather coat lend me,

my hammer to seek, if haply I find it?"

"Though of gold it were I give it to thee,

and for thy sake, though of silver it were."

Flew then Loki the feather coat whirred,

left behind him the halls of the Gods,

and winged his way to the world of Etins.

On a mound sate Thrym, the Thurses' lord;

golden halters for his hounds he twined,

and sleeked the manes of slender horses.

"What ails the Aesir, what ails the Alfs?

Why art thou come to Jotunnheimr?"

"'Tis ill with the Aesir, (ill with the Alfs):

dost hide Hlorrithi's hammer with the?"

"Hlorrithi's hammer I hide with me

full eight rosts deep the ground beneath;

Mjollnir no wight may win from me

but he Freyja bring as bride to me."

Flew then Loki, the feather coat whirred,

left behind him the home of the Etins,

and winged his way to the world of the Gods.

Him Thorr met there in middle court.

These words then first fell from his lips:

"What welcome word rewards thy toil?

tell while aloft thy long tidings:

sitting, one oft his errand forgets,

and lying, tells lies altogether."

"A welcome word rewards my toil:

Thrym has thy hammer, the Thurses' lord.

Mjollnir no wight may win from him,

but he Freyja bring as bride with him."

To Freyja's bower they bent their steps.

These words then first fell from his lips:

"Busk thee, Freyja, in bridal linen,

we twain shall wend to the world of Etins."

Wroth grew Freyja, foamed with rage;

the shining halls shook with her wrath,

the Brisings' necklace burst asunder:

"Most mad after men thou mayst call me,

if I wend thee to the world of Etins!"

To the Thing forthwith fared all Godheads,

and all Goddesses gathered together.

Among them argued the mighty Gods

how they Hlorrithi's hammer'd win back.

Whereon Heimdallr, whitest of the Gods--

he fathomed the future as foreknowing Van--

"Busk we Thorr then in bridal linen,

and buckel on him the Brisings' necklace.

"Let a housewife's door keys dangle about him,

let woman's weeds be worn by him.

Let him bear on his breast bridal jewels,

a hood on his head, as behooves a bride."

The thus spake Thorr, the thewful god:

"A craven wretch may call me the Gods

if I busk me in bridal linen."

Then quoth Loki, Laufey's offspring:

"Hush thee now, Thorr, and heed these words:

soon will the Etins in Asgardhr dwell,

but thou fetch home the hammer from them."

Busked they Thorr then in bridal linen,

buckeled on him the Brisings' necklace.

let a housewife's door keys dangle about him,

and woman's weeds be worn by him:

on his breast he bore bridal jewels,

a hood on his head, as behooves a bride.

Then quoth Loki, Laufey's offspring:

"With thee I will, to wait on thee;

we twain shall wend to the world of Etins."

Then home the goats to the hall were driven,

haltered with ropes to run with the wain:

the mountains brake, the earth burned with fire,

rode Odhinn's son to Jotunnheimr.

Said Thrym these words, the Thurses' lord:

"Stand up, Etins, put straw on benches:

to be my bride they bring me Freyja,

Njordhdottir from Noatun.

"In my gardhr there graze golden-horned kine,

oxen all black, for Etins a joy;

many rings have I, many riches have I,

Freyja alone I lack, methinks."

Soon had the sun set in that land;

then ale was borne on the Etins' table;

ate there an ox and eight salmons,

bolted all dainties dealt for women,

three measures of mead drank Mjollnir's wielder.

Said Thrym these words, the Thurses' lord:

"Where sawest thou bride bite more sharply?

Never saw I bride bite more broadly,

nor more of mead a maiden drink."

The waiting maid wise these words then found,

to the Etin thus she answer made:

"Naught ate Freyja for full eight nights,

so eager was she for Jotunnheimr."

He looked 'neath her veil, longed to kiss her:

back reeled the rash one through roomy hall:

"Why are so fearful Freyja's eyes?

Methinks that fire flames in her eyes!"

The waiting maid wise these words then found,

to the Etin thus she answer made:

"Slept not Freyja for full eight nights,

so eager was she for Jotunnheimr."

In stepped the Etins' starveling sister,

a bridal gift she dared beg from her:

"Rings of red gold give thou to me,

if fain wouldst have my friendship and love,

all my friendship and fondness too."

Said Thrym these words, the Thurses' lord:

"Bring the hammer the bride to bless;

on the maiden's lap lay ye Mjollnir;

in Vor's name then our wedlock hallow!"

Laughed then Hlorrithi's heart within him

when the hammer beheld the hardy one:

Thrym he slew first, the Thurses' lord,

then crushed he all the Etins' kin.

Slew eke the old sister of Etins,

her who had begged for bridal gift.

For shillings she got a shock of the hammer,

a grinding blow for golden rings.

Thus Hlorrithi his hammer got him.

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